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1982 El Salvador earthquake

The 1982 El Salvador earthquake occurred southeast of San Salvador on 19 June at 00:21 local time (06:21 UTC). This undersea earthquake struck offshore in the Pacific Ocean and had a surface wave magnitude of 7.2 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VII (Very strong). Occurring adjacent to a subduction zone at the Middle America Trench, this normal-slip shock left at least 16 and as many as 43 people dead, and many injured, and also inflicted $5 million in damage.

1982 El Salvador earthquake
1982 El Salvador earthquake is located in Central America
Guatemala City
Guatemala City
Tegucigalpa
Tegucigalpa
Managua
Managua
San José
San José
1982 El Salvador earthquake
UTC time1982-06-19 06:21:58
ISC event597450
USGS-ANSSComCat
Local date19 June 1982 (1982-06-19)
Local time00:21:58
Duration25 s (shaking felt)[1]
MagnitudeMs 7.2
Depth82 km (51 mi)
Epicenter13°19′N 89°20′W / 13.31°N 89.34°W / 13.31; -89.34Coordinates: 13°19′N 89°20′W / 13.31°N 89.34°W / 13.31; -89.34
TypeNormal[2]
Areas affectedEl Salvador
Total damage$5 million[3]
Max. intensityVII (Very strong)[3]
LandslidesYes[4]
Casualties16–43 dead[2]

Contents

Tectonic settingEdit

Near the Salvadorian coast, the Cocos Plate is subducting beneath the Caribbean Plate at the Middle America Trench. This earthquake was an intra-slab, normal-slip subduction earthquake in the subducting plate. The subduction zone and a local system of faults along the volcanic chain are two major sources of the earthquakes in El Salvador.[5]

EarthquakeEdit

The mechanism of this earthquake had many similarities with the El Salvador earthquake of 13 January 2001.[6]

IntensityEdit

The intensity in San Salvador reached VII (Very strong).[7][8] The most affected cities are San Salvador, Ahuachapán, Concepción de Ataco, Comasagua, San Miguel, San Pedro Nonualco, and San Juan Tepezontes.[9] This earthquake could be felt in Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica, with intensities V (Moderate) in Guatemala City, Guatemala, IV (Light) in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, V in Managua, Nicaragua, and III (Weak) in San José, Costa Rica.[10][11]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ White, R. A.; Ligorría, J. P.; Cifuentes, I. L. (2004), "Seismic history of the Middle America subduction zone along el Salvador, Guatemala, and Chiapas, Mexico: 1526–2000", Special Paper 375: Natural Hazards in el Salvador, 375, pp. 379–396, doi:10.1130/0-8137-2375-2.379, ISBN 978-0-8137-2375-4
  2. ^ a b USGS (September 4, 2009), PAGER-CAT Earthquake Catalog, Version 2008_06.1, United States Geological Survey
  3. ^ a b National Geophysical Data Center / World Data Service (NGDC/WDS) (1972), Significant Earthquake Database, National Geophysical Data Center, NOAA, doi:10.7289/V5TD9V7K
  4. ^ López, M.; Bommer, J.; Méndez, P. (2004). The Seismic Performance of Bahareque Dwellings in El Salvador (PDF). 13th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, August 1–6, 2004.
  5. ^ Martínez-Díaz, J. J.; Álvarez-Gómez, J. A.; Benito, B.; Hernández, D. (2004), "Triggering of destructive earthquakes in el Salvador" (PDF), Geology, 32: 65–68, doi:10.1130/G20089.1
  6. ^ Bommer, J. J.; Benito, M. B.; Ciudad-Real, M.; Lemoine, A.; López-Menjı́Var, M. A.; Madariaga, R.; Mankelow, J.; Méndez De Hasbun, P.; Murphy, W.; Nieto-Lovo, M.; Rodrı́Guez-Pineda, C. E.; Rosa, H. (2002), "The el Salvador earthquakes of January and February 2001: Context, characteristics and implications for seismic risk" (PDF), Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, 22 (5): 389–418, doi:10.1016/S0267-7261(02)00024-6
  7. ^ http://wwwsoc.nii.ac.jp/jsnds/contents/jnds/23_2_1.pdf
  8. ^ isosistas. Snet.gob.sv (10 October 1986). Retrieved on 25 October 2011.
  9. ^ http://desastres.usac.edu.gt/documentos/pdf/spa/doc909/doc909-contenido.pdf
  10. ^ Significant Earthquakes of the World. Earthquake.usgs.gov (5 January 2010). Retrieved on 25 October 2011.
  11. ^ http://www.crid.or.cr/digitalizacion/pdf/spa/doc807/doc807-b.pdf

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit